Tag Archives: remarkable rocks

Our Adelaide Highlights through Instagram

6 Jun

Hi everyone! The Diamond Jubilee weekend is now over; there was a lot of red, a lot of white, and definitely a lot of blue around London. Pimm’s was flowing (even though one would have definitely appreciated a hot cup of tea), cucumber sandwiches were served at the gazillion of street parties around the country, people were cheering on the streets and in front of the telly.

Have I mentioned the rain? Yes, there was rain. A LOT OF IT. So I thought what better time to reminisce about sunny Adelaide, South Australia? To avoid boring you with too much detail I offer a few highlight shots through the lens of Instagram… Enjoy!

Right. So the moments we treasure the most are…. (drumroll please) …..

1) Swimming with wild dolphins just off Glenelg beach in Adelaide. Amazing experience, especially as you get to see tiny baby dolphins swimming right under you! Tempted to see more? Watch our ‘Getting up close and personal with wild dolphins just off Adelaide coast‘ video.

 2) Getting to taste Haigh’s Chocolate, a proud South Australian icon. The chocolate is so smooth and delicious you won’t want to put a Cadbury in your mouth ever again! And here’s a little secret – if you join the free Chocolate Factory tour in Adelaide you’ll get to taste heaps of samples for FREE!

3) Remarkable Rocks on Kangaroo Island. This 500-million-years-old rock formation is truly remarkable. Want to know how it happened to appear here? Read our ‘Exploring Little Australia, Part 2‘ post to learn more.

4)  Experiencing Aussie cricket at Adelaide Oval. The atmosphere was amazing. People cheering, relaxing on the grass, enjoying the setting sun… Unfortunately, the Oval is now being redeveloped so no cricket there for a while 😦 (luckily you can read about it in our ‘Sun, Surf, Cricket and Tchaikovsky‘ post).

5) Adelaide Zoo. Home to more than 1,800 animals and almost 300 species of exotic and native mammals, birds, reptiles and fish, and most importantly Wang Wang and Funi (check out who they are here), it is a piece of wildlife paradise you won’t want to miss.

6) Adelaide’s Chinatown.  If you want to ‘Eat just like the locals‘, experience different cousines and cultural influences, it’s the place to be. Our lunch combo of Chinese-Japanese-Malaysian was to die for.  

7) And not to forget; we totally smashed a bunch of typically South Australian cakes including the famous Balfours frog cake. Yummy!

How about you? What are YOUR Adelaide highlights?

Exploring ‘Little Australia’; Part 2

1 Mar

We were up early for day two of our trip to Kangaroo Island (check out day 1 here). A short drive and we were at Hanson Bay Sanctuary which includes a Koala Walk. A gentle walk through a eucalyptus-lined path gave us the chance to spot a few of the 30,000 koalas on the island. Though lazy to the extreme (they sleep up to 20 hours/day as their main source of food – eucalyptus – is not very nutritious), they are very cute…

Koalas (which is an aboriginal name and means ‘no drink’; they don’t need to drink as they get all their fluids from eucalyptus leaves) were introduced to the island in 1919 (when 19 koalas were brought). By 1970s their population grew to astonishing 50,000! Since then, various attempts to control their number were introduced in Australia (shooting, de-sexing, giving them chlamydia (!) which makes them infertile). Today, Koalas are protected (shooting them can get you up to 2 years in prison). Did you know koalas are not bears? They are marsupials (similarly to kangaroos) and they carry their babies (which on birth have the size of a fingernail) in their pouch!

From Hanson Bay we headed to Remarkable Rocks, an unbelievable, if uncreatively named, rock formation balanced precariously over the Southern Ocean. The Rocks have been ‘in making’ for 500 million years. It all started with a huge volcanic activity which caused the melting of rock. A granite dome was created which over the next centuries surfaced. For the last 200 million years the dome has been subjected to erosive forces (wind, water) which has caused cracks and created unusual shapes of the rocks. Remarkable or what?!

No less impressive and alliterate was out next destination, Admiral’s Arch – a giant hole where the sea has gnawed hungrily at the landmass. Again a creation of thousands of years of wind and sea erosion, Admiral’s Arch is a huge arch, constantly being battered by huge waves. Amazingly, you can see petrified tree roots hanging from the arch where the underlying soil has been eroded too. On the rocks with a bit more protection from the elements lie hundreds of New Zealand fur-seals (amazingly, over 7,000 fur seals live and breed around Cape du Couedic). Maybe not as cute as the previous day’s sea lions, they’re still pretty cool. We watched one surfing around in the waves- he was even more skilful than Owen in the water (did you know the males are called ‘bulls’ and the females ‘cows’?).

South Australia

Next up we headed to the beach at Stokes Bay. Inaccessible by vehicle, we crawled from one bay to our destination through a series of caves and ended up on yet another perfect, white-sand beach. Ice cream in hand, it doesn’t get much better than this!

South Australia

Eventually we were dragged away from the beach to make our way to the Island Beehive in Kingscote. The island is in fact the sole remaining home to the pure Ligurian Honeybee. After endless tasters – they were all so good! – we bought supplies to take home and made our way to the ferry for the journey home.

Kangaroo Island had provided us with the opportunity to get up close to so many wild animals, and to be able to see them in their natural habitat was incredible. All of that coupled with the beautiful beaches and chilled out, rural atmosphere, had made our visit truly unforgettable.

In words of Isaac Bober from Symmetry, Australia: ‘There really aren’t enough adjectives to accurately describe the beauty of Kangaroo Island. In fact, words can almost spoil the moment.”

Two Days in paradise – Kangaroo Island in photos

28 Feb

Hi everyone,

We have just returned from a two-day Adventure Tour on Kangaroo Island (‘KI’ as the locals call it), courtesy of Sealink. We are working on a informative/funny blog post about the island, however, in the meantime, we just couldn’t wait to share some of our highlights with you. So sit back, relax, and take in the the beautiful jewel that Kangaroo Island is.

But first, a few housekeeping details:

  • Kangaroo Island is the third largest island in Australia
  • Population of KI is 4,400 humans, 30,000 koalas and some 500,000 sheep
  • The island is 155km long and 55km wide
  • KI is recognised as one of the most natural islands on the planet (and voted the ‘Number 1 island in Asia Pacific’ by the National Geographic Traveller Magazine in 2008).
Now, let’s get down to business. At Emu Ridge Eucalyptus Distillery (which is the only one in the world producing eucalyptus oil from the Narrow Leaf Mallee) we got up close and personal with ‘Evil Eye’ – a grumpy emu female who in the past killed her two male counterparts.

Seal Bay is home to 700-800 Australian Sealions, which are currently at the point of extinction (only about 15,000 of them left in Australia).

Little Sahara off the southern coast of the island is a mysterious place. No one can explain how has all the sand moved so far from the coast (which is 3km away).

At Vivonne Bay Lodge, our accommodation for the night, we were welcomed by the cutest roos and wallabies.

Before dinner we got to hang out at Australia’s best beach, Vivonne Bay. It was declared the best beach out of the 1,011 beaches in Australia by Andrew Short who was commissioned by the University of Sydney to explore the 36,000km of Australian coastline (this took him 17 years).

We visited Hanson Bay Koala Sanctuary which is full of these cute and cuddly marsupials chilling up on the trees. As they are sleepy heads by nature, Owen was more interested in a nearby wallaby. The interest was not mutual :).

We made our way to the Remarkable Rocks. 500 mil years of evolution (volcanic activity, landmass movements, water- and wind erosion) has created something truly remarkable.

Admiral’s Arch features a magnificent archway sculpted by the wind and sea where New Zealand fur seals play on the shore platform below.

So what do you think? Which one is YOUR favorite?

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